movies

Ruth Han horror during wartime

Horror during Wartime

Thoughts on Babak Anvari’s film Under the Shadow

I am fascinated by the horror genre. I read scary stories, watch horror films, and listen to creepy podcasts. My favorite works in this genre don’t just thrill me. They also rattle my mind and push me to grapple with heavy questions about human nature: about how humans react to threat or danger, or about…

Claribel Wu la dolce vita

La Dolce Vita

the importance of living in the here and now

Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita has become a classic of Golden Age cinema. Released in 1960, it stars the suave Marcello Mastroianni as Marcello Rubini, an influential journalist living amongst the glitterati in Rome. Throughout the film, he searches for love and happiness in a glamorous world he believes will bring him satisfaction, and in…

katie cafaro sundance review

Love and Crime in the Mountains

In a Year of Mixed Feelings, the Sundance Film Festival’s All-Over-the-Map Programming

The news that An Inconvenient Sequel, the decade-later follow-up to the 2006 Oscar-winning An Inconvenient Truth, would be opening the 2017 Sundance Film Festival came only shortly before the first day, but the pick seemed fitting considering the line-up’s general doom and gloom with twinges of hope and humor. By contrast to its predecessor, Sequel…

cinephilia_graceyoon_illus

the arrival of the train

contemplating cinephilia

I first encountered the Lumière brothers’ L’Arrivée d’un train in an introductory film theory class at Brown. Shot on the Lumière brothers’ revolutionary cinématographe, it was one of the earliest movies to be screened in public. Though groundbreaking when it was released in 1895, the film seemed unremarkable when I saw it: It consists of…

emma marguiles a review of loving and moana

unfamiliar waters

loving and moana at the movies

Loving, Jeff Nichols’ new biopic about the couple at the center of the Supreme Court case that ended anti-miscegenation laws in the United States, is neither truly a biopic nor a film about the center of anything. The name’s on the nose, but only incidentally—Richard Loving (Joel Edgerton) was a white laborer who, in 1958,…