• narrative

    granola bowls or porridge?

    breakfasts with body dysmorphia

    April 25, 2019
    article by , illustrated by

    Content Warning: Eating disorders, body hatred, body dysmorphia  The best weekends of my life have always begun the same way: with a “healthy” breakfast of granola, strawberries, chocolate chips, and brown sugar. Episodes of This is Us keep me company as I eat. In these golden days of old, this delectable cocktail proved a source of reprieve […]

    breaking the silence

    ibuprofen, physical therapy, and generational pain

    April 12, 2019
    article by , illustrated by

    Ibuprofen is the duct tape of the medicinal world (that and Vicks VapoRub). I’ve had the misfortune of dealing with empty bottles of Advil and prescription-grade ibuprofen for my chronic pain for a portion of my life. And despite greater medical access since packing up my things and moving across the country, the once-magical effects […]

    a family of artists

    learning from native american art venues

    April 12, 2019
    article by , illustrated by

    As a young girl, I loved laying under my grandmother’s work table, watching as she molded life out of clay. Diné Bizaad poured out of the radio, the Navajo language mixing with the faint scent of wet dirt to fill the room. Sensing my wonder, my grandmother would invite me to stand beside her. I’d […]

    heritage speaker

    trying to articulate my korean-ness

    April 5, 2019
    article by , illustrated by

    Before preschool, I didn’t know any English. I could only parrot the things adults said to me. Bye-bye, sweetheart. See you later. I could say yes and no without knowing what I was agreeing or disagreeing with. All I understood and spoke was Korean. Then I started preschool—a Korean-only toddler thrown into an English-only environment. […]

    the language of a place

    finding fluency at brown

    April 5, 2019
    article by , illustrated by

    During my first few months at Brown, I discovered a lot of things that I wished people had told me before. I worked hard to not let these nondisclosures feel like little betrayals, redacted knowledge nesting behind the starry-eyed smiles of neighborhood parents, relatives, and others who clasped their hands and joyfully informed me: “You’re […]