• Cecilia Cao

    teens and tens in the ’10s

    the decade’s most important films (to me)

    December 6, 2019
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    As we approach the end of 2019, major publications—readying their year-end arts & culture retrospectives as per usual—are charged with an additional, even more brazen task: determining the highlights of the 2010s at large. How could we ever transition into 2020 without definitive, “official” recognition of the decade’s best and worst content? Yet if these […]

    the value of addams family values

    no plans, no problem

    November 22, 2019
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    Here’s how my Thanksgiving is supposed to go: One subset of the family will host, the others will drive over, and we’ll enjoy a nice midday meal. Here’s how I’m almost certain it will actually go: All drivers will leave the house 30-60 minutes late, causing lunch to be served one to two hours late, […]

    at the pocket-size

    a shortlist of the simple things i’m grateful for

    November 22, 2019
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    long socks Back in high school, I used to stay late after dismissal each day—like, 9 p.m. late. Yes, school rules stated that no student was allowed in the building after 7 p.m. with the exceptions of sports games and parent-teacher conferences. But sometimes I’d get lucky and no one would notice me sitting outside […]

    engines of oppression

    what parasite and snowpiercer say about capitalism

    November 15, 2019
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    Spoiler Alert: Endings of Parasite and Snowpiercer In an interview promoting Parasite, director Bong Joon-ho offered his answer for why the film has become a worldwide phenomenon: “I tried to express a sentiment specific to Korean culture…but all the responses from different audiences were pretty much the same…Because, essentially, we all live in the same […]

    radio in the morning

    bringing home to brown

    November 8, 2019
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    The bright morning sun warmed my back. My footsteps crunched, and I could feel the gravel under my worn, blue tennis shoes. The brisk November air chilled my legs. I shuddered, my thin pajama bottoms rippling in the wind. I buried my nose deeper into my jacket collar and eyed the sky. Another clear day […]